Cisco website: where have all the "t"s gone?

Filed Under: Uncategorized

This is odd.

It appears that the letter "t" has been banished in its entirety from the home page of Cisco's website:

Cisco website

Checking out the html source (or should that be "hml source"?) makes it clear that the problem is not affecting capital Ts, only their younger siblings, the lowercase t. Check out this following picture to see more evidence of the t's exodus from Cisco.

HTML source for Cisco website

The question is this - is this a search-and-replace screw-up by a tired website developer inside Cisco, an error in their server code or something more sinister? My feeling is that there's probably not something malicious behind this (after all, a malicious script wouldn't work as it would be a "scrip" tag instead).

Whatever the problem - they do want to sort it out as soon as possible, as it's a very public way of looking quite silly.

So, any ideas on how we should inform Cisco of this problem. Email webmaser@cisco.com perhaps?

Competition time
It seems to me like this story is a good excuse for a competition. The following words have all had their lowercase "t"s removed from them. You have until the end of Friday to email me what you think the full words should be. So, for instance, if I said "bale", the answer would be "battle".

Appropriately enough, the first set of correct answers out of the hat wins a highly exclusive and much-prized Sophos T-Shirt. (See what I did there?)

1. en
2. enacle
3. ininnabulaions
4. aiude
5. buocks
6. u
7. ier

Credit where credit's due: Thanks to Jess in the Sophos webteam for pointing out the problem with Cisco's website to me.

Update: Cisco's website now seems to have returned to normality.

Competition update: The competition is now closed. Find out what the answers were, and if you have won.

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About the author

Graham Cluley runs his own award-winning computer security blog, and is a veteran of the anti-virus industry having worked for a number of security companies since the early 1990s. Now an independent security analyst, he regularly makes media appearances and gives computer security presentations. Send Graham an email, subscribe to his updates on Facebook, follow him on Twitter and App.net, and circle him on Google Plus for regular updates.