Sexy spammers are stalking me on Twitter

Filed Under: Social networks, Spam

I'm using Twitter to syndicate my blog to people who prefer to use that way to follow the latest breaking news from my (rather untidy) desk. A while back I invited folks to follow me - and thanks to those of you who have.

Well, thanks to some of you at least.

Because this morning, I noticed a few more people had decided to stalk follow me, but their intentions may not be entirely honourable.

Spammers promoting websites via Twitter

What connects these three new followers of my Twitterings? Well, they're all young, female, brunettes. There is a fair bit of pouting going on too. What else? They're all new to Twitter (or at least have only ever made one post), and they're all - curiously - encouraging people to go and check out videos of them with an alluring smiley.

I asked the guys in our labs to look at the urls that my new harem are pointing to, and - sure enough - it appears that this is a spam operation. The links redirect to different sites depending on which part of the world you are living in when you click on them.

So, for instance, at the moment if you click on one of these links and the site determines you are living in Canada you are directed to a sexy dating website.

Dating website promoted by spam

Hmm.. maybe we should all feel pleased that spammers are resorting to using networks like Twitter to try and increase hits as it suggests that old-fashioned email isn't working for them so well. Sorry ladies, your spicy websites are not for me.

Update: Thanks to blog reader and fellow Twitterer David who told me that users of the service can report spam via @spam.

By the way, as Vanja posted over on the SophosLabs blog, our analysts have just added a SophosLabs channel for you to follow. Check it out at http://www.twitter.com/SophosLabs.

You might like

About the author

Graham Cluley is an award-winning security blogger, and veteran of the anti-virus industry having worked for a number of security companies since the early 1990s. Now an independent security analyst, he regularly makes media appearances and gives computer security presentations. Send Graham an email, subscribe to his updates on Facebook, follow him on Twitter and App.net, and circle him on Google Plus for regular updates.