Bobbear suffers from obscene Joe Job attack

Filed Under: Spam

Last week we described how a voluntary website set up to spread information about money laundering scams was suffering from a distributed denial-of-service attack, presumably instigated by the very people that it tries to warn people about.

Today we discover that Bobbear.co.uk is suffering from a new attack - this time in the form of a Joe Job email attack, attempting to discredit the name of the site and its owner Bob Harrison by sending highly offensive messages.

Here is a small sample of the offensive email messages being spammed out, fraudulently claiming to come from Bobbear.co.uk:

Bobbear Joe Job email examples

The result of messages like this is not just that Bobbear's good name is brought into disrepute, but also that the good people at Bobbear receive thousands and thousands of bouncebacks when emails fail to be delivered, clogging their inboxes.

It's clear to me that the bad guys aren't too happy with Bobbear.co.uk spreading information about their internet scams, and are retaliating by attempting to smear the name of the website and strike it with distributed denial-of-service attacks. Our friends at Bobbear, who volunteer their time without payment to assist the internet community, don't deserve this - and could probably benefit from others mirroring the excellent content on their site to make these kinds of attacks less succesful in future.

Long time readers of the Sophos website will remember that this is not the first time that Bobbear has been targeted by the bad guys. In October last year, Sophos reported how a group of internet criminals were attempting to tarnish the name of the Bobbear website with another Joe Job attack, pretending to be messages asking for donations.

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About the author

Graham Cluley is an award-winning security blogger, and veteran of the anti-virus industry having worked for a number of security companies since the early 1990s. Now an independent security analyst, he regularly makes media appearances and gives computer security presentations. Send Graham an email, subscribe to his updates on Facebook, follow him on Twitter and App.net, and circle him on Google Plus for regular updates.