From Server/Outlook update to FDIC to Facebook phish: now with a twist

Filed Under: Malware, Social networks, SophosLabs, Spam, Vulnerability

In the past few weeks, the authors behind Zbot has been busy. Around October 12 we have seen the server upgrade spam with links. Later on the 14th we've seen the same campaign Outlook updates.

For a few days during the past week, the group has turned their attention to the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC), spamming out links to malware sites with the message below:

With the global economy as it is, notice of bank failures would certainly draw a lot of attention and irrational behavior. After all, thoughts of hard-earned money being gone forever is going to scare a lot of people. Of course, downloading the "personal FDIC insurance file" would give nothing but grief. The bank deposits are still safe, but the computer would probably get infected.

After the blast of FDIC messages, the Zbot authors turned to fFacebook as their latest platform to spread malware. However, they added a twist to it. The messages are well-crafted to look like a real Facebook message:

The message asks the user to update their facebook account. The new twist is that, when they get to the linked site, there is no link to download an executable yet. Instead, they're shown with a fake Facebook login page:

Victims who have entered their Facebook login would get their account details phished, probably for the purpose of spreading more malware. Since this is not a real Facebook page, any random login info would bring you to this next page:

It is on this page where the malware author provides an executable for download. This file, updatetool.exe is a Zbot executable that is proactive detected as Mal/EncPk-LE.

With the creative social engineering that the Zbot authors have been using, users should be real careful when reading messages, whether it's in an email or from a social network. Avoid clicking links directly, manually type the address to access the site, and not executing files would do a lot in protecting one's computer.

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