Dutch police website attacked after arrest of suspected hacker

Filed Under: Denial of Service, Law & order, Malware

Dutch policemanJust a day after Dutch police arrested a 16-year-old boy in connection with Wikileaks-related denial-of-service attacks, websites belonging to the Netherlands computer crime cops and prosecutors have been struck with a similar assault.

Dennis Janus, a spokesman for the National Police Service confirmed that both the police website, and that of the National Prosector's Office had been offline for much of the day, with many theorising that the likely reason is a distributed denial-of-service (DDoS) attack similar to that which was launched against Mastercard, PayPal and other firms.

Inaccessible Dutch prosecution website

Janus didn't confirm that the downtime of the websites was definitely connected with the ongoing attacks by WikiLeaks supporters, but you would be a brave man to bet otherwise as sheer coincidence seems highly unlikely.

Members of the public, sympathetic with the actions of the controversial WikiLeaks whistle-blowing website, have been downloading a DDoS attack tool called LOIC, turning their home computers into an attack tool against websites in AnonOps' bad books.

Remember folks - if you assist in a denial-of-service attack you could be looking at a lengthy jail sentence.

The unnamed teenager, who is said to have confessed to playing a part in the attacks against the PayPal and Mastercard websites, is due to appear in a court in Rotterdam today.

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4 Responses to Dutch police website attacked after arrest of suspected hacker

  1. bfjaz · 1421 days ago

    Part 1
    "if you assist in a denial-of-service attack you could be looking at a lengthy jail sentence." Something about this doesn't sit right with me. It sounds like big government and big business trying to scare people away from doing something to be heard in this situation.
    For the past 30 years I have felt powerless against big government and big business and big media outlets. I am just a worker ant and my voice is never heard. Yes I vote, but most time these days my choice is the lesser of two evils. Candidates have to be backed by big business or they don't stand a chance. The media won't look at them if they are small fish.

  2. bfjaz · 1421 days ago

    Part 2
    I was a teen in the sixties and we were heard!. But mass protest doesn't seem to help today. Witness the student protest in England yesterday. Prince Charles had such a low opinion of their power that he dared to try to pass them in a "limo"- these poor students protesting a tuition hike. And today is the news "Tuition to be hiked"? No! It is "Prince Charles attacked"
    Now people all over the world are outraged at this "shoot the messanger" approach of the USA and big business against Julian Assange. They are outraged that Wikileaks website has been censored in our supposedly free countries. And dam it if they aren't making themselves heard.
    It seems to me that the unwashed masses have found the tech age means of being heard. And it has united people all over the world for one cause. I am sure other arrests will be made to 'put the fear of the man in all of us"
    This whole reaction on social media is great. Finally we have a way of striking back.

  3. Major · 1419 days ago

    "Remember folks - if you assist in a denial-of-service attack you could be looking at a lengthy jail sentence."

    What about all of the people with compromised machines in their home who have no idea that they're a participant in an attack? I'm sure there are many more of them than there are active (and willing) participants in these Wikileaks-related DDoS attacks.

    • D92 · 1419 days ago

      computer forensics team should be able to sniff the traffic and then grab the IP and contact the host/ISP.

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Graham Cluley runs his own award-winning computer security blog, and is a veteran of the anti-virus industry having worked for a number of security companies since the early 1990s. Now an independent security analyst, he regularly makes media appearances and gives computer security presentations. Send Graham an email, subscribe to his updates on Facebook, follow him on Twitter and App.net, and circle him on Google Plus for regular updates.