EA resets users' passwords following LulzSec hack

Filed Under: Data loss, Privacy

A number of customers of EA (Electronic Arts) are reporting receiving emails from the company telling them that their passwords have been reset as a security measure.

Here's one such email forwarded to us by a reader of Naked Security:

EA password reset email

Your password was recently reset to ensure account security. Changing your password regularly is always helpful to protect your account. Please visit this [LINK] to reset your password.

If you have any questions or if you experience any troubles during login please feel free to contact our support at 1-877-357-6007.

Sincerely,
Customer Support
Electronic Arts, Inc.

The good news is that the emails do appear to be legitimate, rather than a phishing scam targeting video game players.

It's quite natural to assume that EA has reset users' passwords because it is concerned that credentials have been compromised. And maybe this password reset is linked to the LulzSec hacking group's apparent final attack over the weekend, which exposed login details of over half a million players of EA's Battlefield Heroes game amongst a hoard of other data.

Information exposed by LulzSec

My advice to you is to use different passwords on each and every website you access, and make sure they can not be easily guessed or cracked.

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One Response to EA resets users' passwords following LulzSec hack

  1. anon · 1029 days ago

    The list of the leaked accounts also available at http://dazzlepod.com/lulzsec/final/

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About the author

Graham Cluley is an award-winning security blogger, and veteran of the anti-virus industry having worked for a number of security companies since the early 1990s. Now an independent security analyst, he regularly makes media appearances and gives computer security presentations. Send Graham an email, subscribe to his updates on Facebook, follow him on Twitter and App.net, and circle him on Google Plus for regular updates.