Michael Jackson unreleased tracks stolen from Sony

Filed Under: Celebrities, Data loss, Law & order

Michael JacksonMusic company Sony is reported to have confirmed that hackers stole the entire Michael Jackson back catalogue of recordings, including unreleased tracks, in May last year.

Fortunately, unlike previous security breaches involving Sony, no customer information was exposed during the hack.

The Michael Jackson-related hack occurred at approximately the same time, but has been kept under wraps until now.

This latest reported hack is clearly embarrassing for the company which paid some $250 million after Jackson's death to retain the rights to the pop singer's back catalogue, and to release seven posthumous albums.

But it's important to remember that Sony is a victim of a criminal act. They did the right thing at the time of this newly-revealed Michael Jackson breach by contacting the authorities, who are said to have apprehended two British suspects in May 2011.

Sony became something of a whipping-boy last year, with a series of high profile security incidents.

James Marks, 26, from Daventry, and 25-year-old James McCormick from Blackpool, have appeared in court to deny computer misuse and copyright offences in connection with the Sony/Michael Jackson data breach. They are scheduled to stand trial in January 2013.

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2 Responses to Michael Jackson unreleased tracks stolen from Sony

  1. Robin Garr · 779 days ago

    That's a terrible headline! Were the hackers from Sony? Try " ... stolen from Sony by hackers."

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About the author

Graham Cluley is an award-winning security blogger, and veteran of the anti-virus industry having worked for a number of security companies since the early 1990s. Now an independent security analyst, he regularly makes media appearances and gives computer security presentations. Send Graham an email, subscribe to his updates on Facebook, follow him on Twitter and App.net, and circle him on Google Plus for regular updates.