Monthly Archives: April 2013

CERN Geneva celebrates 20 years of the World Wide Web

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It was twenty years ago today/That the World Wide Web came out to play...

On 30 April 1993, CERN Geneva officially put the Web, and the early client and server side software that made it work, into the public domain...

How to rate a comparative anti-virus test - a six-step guide

How to rate a comparative anti-virus test - a 6-step guide

It sometimes seems like anyone with a computer feels qualified to do comparative anti-virus testing. There are a lot of pitfalls to look out for, which often trip up unwary would-be testers and regularly lead to wonky data and odd conclusions. So how do you know which tests are any good?

What WERE they thinking? Internet-enabled cameras under the security lens once again...

Vulnerability researchers at Core Security recently turned their attention on internet-enabled cameras, finding lots of holes.

And when security holes arise from features, not bugs, you really do feel like shouting aloud, "What WERE they thinking?"

"Wire transfer canceled"? Watch out for spammed-out malware attack

"Wire transfer canceled"? Watch out for spammed-out malware attack

If you've received an email in your inbox telling you that your wire transfer has been cancelled, take care - as it's the latest attempt by online criminals to infect the general public's Windows computers.

Thieves may have used GPS to track burglary victim

Thieves may have used GPS to track US burglary victim

The owner of a jewelry store believes that one or more burglars stuck GPS devices on her car and on her son's car. That, she figures, enabled them to track when her house would likely be empty so they could break in.

Would you let a spammer give you a root canal? Sure you would!

When someone contacts you entirely for their benefit, out of the blue, and pitches you a concept that is peculiar at best, and outright alarming at worst...

...you really do find yourself thinking, "Why? WHY? What can the sender POSSIBLY hope to get out of this?"

Troll admits to making death threats against children on Facebook

Troll admits to making death threats against children on Facebook

A 24-year-old UK man has admitted to posting threats on the Facebook tribute page of a teenager killed after being thrown from a truck.

He told police he didn't think anybody would take the threats seriously. He was very wrong.

Guardian Twitter accounts hacked by the Syrian Electronic Army

Guardian Twitter accounts hacked by the Syrian Electronic Army

The Syrian Electronic Army is up to its dirty tricks again - this time hijacking Twitter accounts belonging to The Guardian.

Apple iMessage "censors" mention of Obama: international conspiracy...or software bug?

Try sending the message "I could be the next Obama" via the iMessage service from your iPhone or your iPad!

Paul Ducklin takes a look at a humorous bug that teaches us some serious lessons...

Monday review - the hot 20 stories of the week

Monday review

Catch up with all the security news from the last seven days - it's weekly roundup time.

Google tightens up Play Store policy, officially bans "off-market" updates...

Google has made a number of changes to its Android Play Store ecosystem recently.

There's now a rudimentary anti-virus provided with the OS, a ban on ad blockers, and, most recently, an official policy on sneaky "off-market" updates...

50,000,000 usernames and passwords lost as LivingSocial "special offers" site hacked

LivingSocial, the online offers site owned in largish part by Amazon, has just emailed its userbase, said to be 50,000,000-strong, to fess up to a data breach.

Another day, another shed-load of password hashes in the hands of crooks....

Suspect in massive Spamhaus DDoS attack arrested in Spain

A 35-year-old Dutch national, officially identified only as S.K., was arrested in Spain on Thursday.

He is accused of DDoS attacks against Spamhaus and others.

Who is S.K., do you think?

How effective are data breach penalties? Are ever-bigger fines enough?

Since 2011, data security company ViaSat UK has spiced up the Infosecurity Europe conference by filing a Freedom of Information request for data breach statistics.

In previous years they've fallen out with the regulators over the matter, but things turned out better in 2013...

US child abuse image suspect shielded from decrypting hard drives

US child abuse image suspect shielded from decrypting hard drives

The federal magistrate found that forced decryption would violate the computer scientist's Fifth Amendment rights against self-incrimination. It's no triumph for the agents who fight child abuse, but it is a win for privacy and for curtailment of government power over our data.

Mac malware found in malformed Word documents - is China to blame?

Mac malware found in malformed Word documents - is China to blame?

Minority groups in China appear to have been targeted by a Mac malware attack, delivered via boobytrapped Word documents.

Who could possibly be interested in targeting their computers?

"Government seeks a warrant to hack" - US judge gives his decision

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Do you usually shy away from legal documents?

Well, here's one that's well worth reading: it deals very interestingly with the zone in which busting cybercrooks and protecting privacy intersect...

The Redkit malware exploit gang has a message for security blogger Brian Krebs

The Redkit malware exploit gang has a message for security blogger Brian Krebs

Award-winning security blogger Brian Krebs is loved by everyone on the internet... apart from the criminals.

Find out what they're saying about him in their latest version of the Redkit exploit kit.

New incoming fax message is actually malware - be on your guard!

Example of junk fax

Computer users are warned to be on the lookout for messages in their email inbox, claiming to be an incoming fax.

Former Reuters editor Matthew Keys pleads not guilty to giving logins to Anonymous

US indicts 13 suspected Anonymous members for Operation Payback

US federal prosecutors claim that journalist Matthew Keys handed over login credentials for his former employer, Los Angeles Times' parent company, Tribune Company. Keys' defense says it was the work of an imposter.