Articles by Lisa Vaas

About Lisa Vaas

I've been writing about technology, careers, science and health since 1995. I rose to the lofty heights of Executive Editor for eWEEK, popped out with the 2008 crash, joined the freelancer economy, and am still writing for my beloved peeps at places like Sophos's Naked Security, CIO Mag, ComputerWorld, PC Mag, IT Expert Voice, Software Quality Connection, Time, and the US and British editions of HP's Input/Output. I respond to cash and spicy sites, so don't be shy.

Snapchat to address sketchy third-party apps with public API ... at some point

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Oh, those darn third-party apps, their home-brewed APIs and their photo-leaking ways, Snapchat moaned on Wednesday morning, promising to cook up a public API to fix the situation... sooner or later.

U2's Bono says sorry for foisting album on everybody's iTunes

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In a Facebook interview, a U2 fan - or, well, maybe just somebody who took advantage of the chance to tell off the band - asked the band to please never release an automatically downloaded album again, given that "It's really rude."

Attacker takes over Facebook page set up for 'Bucket List Baby' Shane, posts porn

Attacker takes over Facebook page set up for 'Bucket List Baby' Shane, posts porn

A Facebook page set up to chronicle the extremely short life of a baby with the rare, terminal condition of anencephaly was hijacked within days of the infant's death and set to display lewd images. The parents, who had lost their child mere days before, fell for one of the most vile phishing attacks ever.

Dropbox passwords leaked, third-party services blamed

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Hundreds of Dropbox logins were posted on Pastebin and Reddit, but it turns out they were stolen from a third-party service months ago, Dropbox says. So why did some of those passwords work, as Reddit users claimed? Think password reuse.

Google ordered to forget 'endangered' man's search results by Tokyo court

Tokyo court orders Google to forget 'endangered' man's search results

Takedown-rights fever has hit Tokyo, where a District Court on Thursday issued an injunction forcing Google to take down about 120 of 230 search results about a Japanese man that implicated him in past crimes because he felt his life was being endangered by the search results.

Another game developer flees her home following Gamergate death threats

Another game developer flees her home following Gamergate death threats

US-based game developer Brianna Wu (the third woman to be driven from her home in what's being dubbed the Gamergate controversy) after a troll posted her address online and threatened to rape, kill and mutilate her.

'The Snappening': Snapchat images flood the internet after SnapSaved.com hack

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Hundreds of thousands of supposedly self-destructing Snapchat snaps have been apparently jimmied out of the database for SnapSaved.com, a third-party website not affiliated with Snapchat which allows users to save unopened photos from Snapchat without the sender knowing the images have been saved.

Backoff malware gang hits Dairy Queen stores

Backoff malware gang hits Dairy Queen stores

Customers' payment card details may have been whipped out of nearly 400 Dairy Queen stores in the US. It's just the latest in a string of PoS malware infections that have been slamming US retailers.

FBI's warrantless 'hack' of Silk Road was legal, prosecutors claim

FBI's warrantless 'hack' of Silk Road was legal, prosecutors claim

Even if FBI agents did hack their way into the Silk Road without a warrant - and they're most certainly not confessing to that, mind you - the intrusion would have been an upstanding, law-abiding, Fourth Amendment-respecting act of criminal investigation, the government argued in a Monday court filing.

Reminder: iCloud's going to demand app-specific passwords from third-party apps

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Yes, your third-party calendar, mail and contacts apps that don't support Apple's new two-factor authentication system are going to turn 10 toes up on your iThings. You'll need app-specific passwords to get at the cloud data.

Adobe will update e-reader to mop up clear-text data spillage

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Adobe is working on an update to fix the latest iteration of its e-book reader, which has a gluttonous appetite for readers' data and the slovenly habit of reporting our reading habits back to Adobe - in plain text.

Twitter sues US federal agencies in attempt to remove the gag around surveillance

Twitter sues US federal agencies in attempt to remove the gag around surveillance

Twitter doesn't want its transparency report to be fuzzy to the point of meaninglessness, full of "broad, inexact ranges" about how many times the US government has shaken it down in its surveillance operations, it says – for example, by counting them to the nearest thousand.

AT&T hit by insider breach; "change your passcode" it warns

AT&T hit by insider breach; "change your passcode" it warns

AT&T, the giant US telecom, says it fired an insider for having thumbed through customer accounts without authorization and potentially slurping customers' taxpayer IDs, driver license numbers and more.

Dubai police add facial recognition to Google Glass

Dubai police add facial recognition to Google Glass

A spokesman confirmed a report that Dubai police have developed software that will connect a Glass wearer to a database of wanted people.

Is it 1984 yet?

Celebgate continues, nude celebrity photos posted of Winona Ryder, Hulk Hogan's son

Celebgate continues, nude celebrity photos posted of Winona Ryder, Hulk Hogan's son

Yet another crop of nude photos has been released. More will come. The salacious are still as thrilled as ever, but much of the internet is just hitting the snooze button and rolling over. Why do we stop caring about theft and privacy invasion?

Google responds to celebrity lawyer's $100m nude photo scandal lawsuit threat

Take down nudies or we'll sue you for $100m, celebs' lawyer warns Google

Google has responded to a letter written by a lawyer on behalf of a dozen celebrities whose nude photos were stolen and published online.

Facebook sort-of apologizes for treating users like lab rats

Facebook sort-of apologizes for treating users like lab rats

Facebook says it was "unprepared" for the ruckus stirred up around its emotional contagion research, and that there were things "it should have done differently." Does that include asking for informed consent next time?

Security incidents are up - and pricier! - but infosec budgets are dwindling

Security incidents are up - and pricier! - but budgets to prevent them dwindle

The number of security incidents is popping, as are associated costs to mop them up, according to a report from PcW. Global corporate security budgets, meanwhile, seem to be hiding in the closet, just hoping it all goes away.

Facebook says sorry to LGBT community over real-name policy, promises change

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Facebook's apologised and promised to fix what turns out to be, it admits, an unsophisticated policy that doesn't reflect the importance of pseudonyms in protecting people from harassment and violence.