Law & order

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Guy brags about gift card tinkering at new job, gets house raided by feds

Gift cards. Image courtesy of Shutterstock

The new recruit showed off to a colleague, calling the gift-card tinkering "research". We'll see what Homeland Security thinks about it after they scour the electronics they seized from his house.

SSCC 158 - What do you mean, "Don't knit your own remote authentication"? [PODCAST]

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Here's this week's Chet Chat security podcast for your listening pleasure.

Chester Wisniewski and Paul Ducklin of Sophos dissect the week's security news to see what we can learn from other people's mistakes...

Police slap warning banner ads on 'pirate' sites

Pirate warning. Image courtesy of Shutterstock

The City of London Police has started swapping out legitimate ads on websites believed to be serving up pirated content, instead plastering them with warning banner ads.

One hoax press release, one $300 million hole in mining company

One hoax press release, one $300 million hole in Australian mining company

The fake press release was pretty convincing: it was sent from a domain that riffed on the ANZ Bank name, used the bank's logo, and included the name of a PR person, along with his (NOT!) phone number. It's yet another example of how easy it is to scam people online.

eBay's StubHub ransacked for over $1 million, international crime ring arrested

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US police have indicted six people across four countries on charges of defrauding eBay's StubHub for over $1 million in pilfered tickets for things like Jay-Z and Justin Timberlake concerts. eBay says its servers weren't broken into; rather, password reuse and account holders' PCs being riddled with malware are to blame.

500,000-per-day SMS spammer gets just £4,000 fine

500,000-per-day SMS spammer gets just £4,000 fine

An Indian call-centre operator has been fined by a London court for breaching Data Protection laws, but despite his operation bombarding UK cell phones with spams, his punishment amounts to little more than a slap on the wrist.

Your Gmail account is fair game for cops or feds, says US judge

US judge: your Gmail account is fair game for cops or feds

A New York court on Thursday opened up our entire Gmail accounts to feds or cops with warrants, in spite of two recent decisions that went against similar requests.

Jailed Apple phishing duo also imported pickpockets and cloned credit cards

Constanta Agrigoroaie and Radu Savoae. Images courtesy of Metropolitan Police.

How's this for irony? A pair of fraudsters phished bank account details out of over 150 Apple users by sending them hairy-scary messages about their accounts having been compromised.

New York proposes strict regulations for Bitcoin

New York proposes strapping a regulatory straitjacket onto Bitcoin

The rules are strict. Will the community pay heed, or will it ignore attempts to control this wild landscape?

It's all about trust! 60 Sec Security [VIDEO]

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Watch 60 Second Security for 19 July 2014 - it's all about trust!

Notorious Shylock banking malware taken out by law enforcement

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Law enforcement action led by the National Crime Agency (NCA) in the UK has knocked out the infrastructure of a banking malware known as Shylock, because of excerpts from Shakespeare's Merchant of Venice hidden in its code.

Here's how to check to make sure you weren't among the more than 30,000 PCs that were infected.

13-year-old girl arrested for Facebook death threats against entire town

Silhouette. Image courtesy of Shutterstock

Despite specific threats to kill a 12-year-old cancer patient along with the entire population of a Texas town, Facebook initially stonewalled police's efforts to find the identity of whoever was making the terrorist threats. It baffled police, as well it should.

Child abuse images dragnet snares 660 suspected paedophiles

Child abuse images dragnet snares 660 suspected paedophiles

Doctors, teachers, scout leaders, care workers and former police officers - all professions that entail unsupervised access to children - were among 660 who've been arrested in an unprecedented child abuse image dragnet in the UK.

SSCC 156 - Warbiking in Manhattan, hubris for Google, and how less can be more [PODCAST]

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Sophos experts Chester Wisniewski and Paul Ducklin are back with this week's security podcast, turning plain old news into advice you can use.

"Gameover" malware revival - is it really up from the canvas?

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Is the recent re-appearance of the Gameover malware a flash in the pan, or part of a concerted effort at reviving the threat?

What do we need to do to knock it out altogether?

Arrests made after keyloggers found on public PCs at US hotels

Keyloggers found on public PCs at US hotel business centres

Proof of the lack of hygiene in publicly accessible PCs came up yet again when the US Secret Service last week warned that cybercrooks are installing keyloggers on the PCs in hotel business centers to steal personal and business information from travelers.

"Gameover" malware returns from the dead...

In early June 2014, a internationally co-ordinated law enforcement effort against the criminals behind the infamous Gameover malware pretty much wiped out their botnet altogether.

Bad news - it looks as though Gameover is back...

Microsoft and No-IP reach settlement over malware takedown

Microsoft and No-IP reach settlement over malware takedown

Microsoft has reached a settlement with domain provider No-IP less than two weeks after it grabbed 23 internet domain names, knocking out 1.8 million customer sites and over 5 million hostnames.

Tor Project is NOT getting sued for enabling revenge porn site PinkMeth

Tor Project is NOT getting sued for enabling revenge porn site PinkMeth

A Texas revenge-porn victim is suing the operators of revenge-porn site PinkMeth.com and was (until her lawyer figured out just what, exactly, the anonymising service Tor actually is) suing The Tor Project for helping PinkMeth to operate anonymously.

UK to rush through "emergency" phone and internet data retention law

UK to rush through "emergency" phone and internet data retention law

The UK is rushing through Parliament what it calls an emergency law that will ensure it retains access to people's phone and internet records, in spite of the European Court of Justice having said in April that data retention violates human rights. It's not a rehash of the Snooper's Charter, politicians claim, but there's not a lot of time to eyeball it to make sure that's true.