Law & order

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Police dog catches paedophiles by sniffing out their hidden hard drives

Police dog catches paedophiles by sniffing out their hidden hard drives

Police detection dogs are the latest tool in investigators' arsenal when it comes to finding gadgets that might contain illegal images of child abuse, sometimes hidden in metal tins four layers deep inside a filing cabinet.

Holiday snaps and nuclear intel: The NSA's data capture exposed

NSA catches only 10% of data legally, but is it a fair trade off?

That leaves large-scale privacy invasion on 90% of 160,000 analysed messages swept up illegally by the NSA. But credit where credit is due: the legal 10% of intercepts have significant intelligence value, including data about a secret overseas nuclear project and double-dealing by an ostensible ally.

Student jailed for refusing to hand over password to police

Student jailed for refusing to hand over password to police

Christopher Wilson, who has his own business programming artificial intelligence systems, is suspected of hacking into police websites and using a voice-changing device to make hoax telephone calls warning of a cyber attack. When detectives asked Wilson to reveal his computer password to aid in their investigation he refused.

Monday review - the hot 22 stories of the week

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It's weekly roundup time!

Here's all the great stuff we've written in the past seven days.

Russia's latest internet law proposal - anti-NSA, or pro-FSB?

Russian computer. Image courtesy of Shutterstock

Russia's parliament, the State Duma, has heard another internet freedom bill requiring foreign web firms to host any data on Russia citizens within Russia's borders. This would mean the likes of Google and Facebook would need to set up datacenters within Russia and redesign their operations so that individual user data would only be stored inside the country.

SSCC 154: Fraud, viruses, patches and encryption (in that order!) [PODCAST]

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Where does your country sit on the fraud list? Just how much can you trust SMSes on Android? Is Apple serious enough about iOS security? And will Google's End-To-End email encryption plugin save the world?

Find out with Chet and Duck in this week's Chet Chat podcast...

Microsoft takes down No-IP DNS domains in cybercrime fight - right or wrong? [POLL]

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Vote in our poll!

Was Microsoft's takeover of 23 of another company's domain names a justifiable step in dealing with cybercrime, or a disruptive step too far?

EFF sues NSA over hoarding of zero days

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Wouldn't it be nice to know just how, exactly, the spy agency decides whether to silently exploit zero days for snooping purposes while leaving businesses and individuals in the dark with their bellies exposed? The EFF has filed a FOIA lawsuit to help find answers.

Did Facebook's emotion experiment break the law? ICO probes

Did Facebook's emotion experiment break the law? ICO probes

Did Facebook's emotional manipulation study break data protection laws? The UK's Information Commissioner's Office is to investigate the experiment, which caused outrage after it manipulated the feeds of close to 700,000 users to determine how they reacted to positive or negative news.

Supreme Court refuses to drag Google out of its Street View privacy wreckage

Supreme Court won't drag Google out of its Street View privacy wreckage

Google's planning to slurp up ever more data, from wearables, fitness apps and more. It sure would be nice for Google if the Street View fiasco would fade away and stop reminding people of how they snooped on data and then lied about it, but the Supreme Court isn't disposed to helping it out on this one.

Ex-boyfriend avoids jail for posting offensive update on woman's Facebook account

Smartphone. Image courtesy of Shutterstock

The case - one which involves prosecution over damage to a social media account - is reportedly unprecedented. The guilty party was facing a maximum of 10 years in prison and a €10,000 fine, with a judge who had no precedents to go on when it came time for sentencing.

Facebook's facing a losing battle to protect users' privacy

Facebook's facing a losing battle to protect users' privacy

Last year, prosecutors in Manhattan held Facebook up by the ankles and shook out personal data on 381 users. A judge last week said that it's up to the targeted users to complain about privacy invasion, not data-repository Facebook. But how are they supposed to stand up for their rights if they're never told about the sealed warrants to begin with?

Hacker who plotted to send heroin to Brian Krebs arrested in Italy

Hacker who plotted to send heroin to Brian Krebs arrested in Italy

I don't envy the scriptwriters who are busy at work on the Krebs movie. The news just keeps coming! The latest: Sergei Vovnenko, known as Fly, was arrested under suspicion of trafficking in stolen credit cards as well as plotting to send heroin to the security journalist/crimefighter.

Canadian spam, New York taxis and Brazilian passwords - 60 Sec Security [VIDEO]

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Canada goes "opt in", NYC makes a hash, and Brazil forgets its punctuation.

It's 60 Second Security for 28 June 2014!

Serial hacker Cameron Lacroix gets four year jail term after taking plea bargain

Man behind bars. Image courtesy of Shutterstock.

A serial hacker with a long history of computer offences has pleaded guilty to computer intrusion and access device fraud charges, accepting a sentence of four years in jail in return for his plea.

SSCC 153: TrueCrypt, Towelroot, Cryptowall, and spam in Canada [PODCAST]

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Chester Wisniewski and Paul Ducklin present this week's edition of the regular Sophos security podcast, the "Chet Chat."

In this episode: the TrueCrypt saga continues; the Towelroot software for unlocking Androids; ransomware after CryptoLocker; and Canada's long, long, long-awaited anti-spam law.

Cupid Media "breached Privacy act" after storing users' passwords in plain text

Heart. Image courtesy of Shutterstock.

The Australian Privacy Commissioner has ruled that Cupid Media Pty Ltd breached the Privacy Act following a data breach which saw over 40 million customer records exposed.

Carwash POS systems hacked, credit card data drained

Carwash POS systems hacked, credit card data drained

Police in the US state of Massachusetts have busted what they say is a gang of thieves who were buying stolen credit cards and using them to buy gift cards that were then sometimes exhausted of their balance, washed clean of data and reloaded with more stolen credit card data.

US House votes "overwhelmingly" to cut funding of NSA surveillance

NSA surveillance funding cuts OKed by US House

A strong majority of the US House have voted to cut funding for surveillance on citizens or for planting backdoors that let the government slip past encryption that's supposed to shield communications.

Privacy and iOS 8, USMS blunder and Cryptowall ransomware - 60 Sec Security [VIDEO]

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One minute of fun with a serious side...

60 Second Security - 21 June 2014