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Samsung Galaxy S5 fingerprint reader hacked - it's the iPhone 5s all over again!

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The Samsung Galaxy S5 fingerprint scanner can be fooled with wood glue, just like Apple's "Touch ID" sensor in the iPhone 5s.

So why are both Apple and Samsung touting fingerprint scanners as more secure than passwords?

Heartbleed, Google Play and XP - 60 Sec Security [VIDEO]

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How hard is Heartbleed recovery? How hard does Google Play try to keep the garbage out? And how hard are you trying to get over XP?

60 Second Security has the answers in a short, fun security video.

Google takes down fake anti-virus app that duped 10,000 users on Play Store

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The Virus Shield app cost $3.99 and claimed to be a scanner that protected Android devices from viruses, while promising to never annoy users with pop-up ads found on many free apps.

Too bad for the 10,000 people who paid for it - Virus Shield was a fake.

Google takes aim at deceptive advertising of Play Store apps

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Google has announced updates to its developer policies for the Play Store app market to ban certain types of misleading and underhanded advertising behavior.

We look at three apps that use now-forbidden promotional tactics, plus we offer security tips to help you avoid unwanted and malicious apps.

Is Amazon hacking our apps? Or doing us all a security favour?

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A war of words that started out as a fairly stinging criticism of Amazon has mellowed out into praise for the cloud services behemoth.

It seems that Amazon is checking mobile apps for security risks, and heaping advice on developers who have wandered off the straight and narrow...

Kill-switch for mobile phones could save US consumers $2.6B per year, says report

Kill-switch for mobile phones could save US consumers $2.6B per year, says report

US consumers are spending CRAZY money to replace stolen phones and to insure the pocket-sized thief magnets, says a new report from Creighton University.

Monday review - the hot 21 stories of the week

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Make sure you're up to date with everything we wrote in the last seven days - it's weekly roundup time.

Spyware app turns the privacy tables on Google Glass wearers

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A spyware app developed by two researchers has shown that Google Glass can be used to secretly take photos of whatever a Glass wearer is looking at without their knowledge - making the Glass user the one whose privacy and security is potentially compromised.

Phone spyware, Mac security, and WhatsApp privacy - 60 Sec Security [VIDEO]

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How do you get spyware on your victim, er, target's phone? Have Mac users changed their attitude to security? And how deep does privacy run at WhatsApp?

Find out in 60 seconds!

WhatsApp and privacy - will Facebook make things better, worse, or both?

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WhatsApp, the super-popular SMS replacement acquired by Facebook for $19 billion, continues to wrestle with a thorny problem.

How can it tame the public's attitude to its own attitude to privacy?

Advice on getting the most from Windows XP, courtesy of the Google Play Store

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Google Play just recommended some technical books I might like.

To help me get the most out of Windows XP...

mSpy now selling phones pre-loaded with spyware

mSpy now selling phones pre-loaded with spyware

You used to have to get your hands on somebody's gadget to eavesdrop on them like a creepy stalker, but no more! Now, you can just buy your target a boobytrapped bugging device-cum phone, wrap it up with a pretty bow, and try to pretend that you're not trampling on their privacy when you "gift" them with it.

Anatomy of an Apple theft protection bypass - and how to avoid it

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A tiny but intriguing open source project entitled iCloudHacker attracted interest over the weekend.

It claims to "bypass Apple's theft protection" - and although that's streching the truth a bit, it has some lessons to teach us about encryption...

MasterCard aims to reduce card fraud with smartphone geo-location technology

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MasterCard and Syniverse are running a pilot scheme that aims to reduce credit card fraud by making sure that a customer's card and mobile phone are in the same location when the card is used.

Are you safe against mobile threats? Check out our tips for keeping the crooks away...

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Do you use a mobile device? (Of course you do!)

Read Sophos researcher Vanja Svajcer's paper, "Mobile Security Threat Report," and check out our expert tips for keeping the crooks away...

Anatomy of a "goto fail" - Apple's SSL bug explained, plus an unofficial patch for OS X!

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Apple just patched an SSL/TLS bug in iOS - but the flaw is not yet fixed in OS X.

Paul Ducklin comes to the rescue with explanations, mitigations, and even an unofficial patch! (For educational purposes only, you understand.)

The Talking Angela witch hunt - what on earth is going on?

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For the last week, the internet - and Facebook in particular - has been positively moist with the foamy, spittle flecks of an outraged, pitchfork wielding mob. The outrage has been so verbose and so sudden that the internet has all but run out of upper case letters.

Patching XP, Flappy Bird malware, Tesco passwords leaked - 60 Sec Security [VIDEO]

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Did you really think XP would go patch-free? Is Flappy Bird really dead? Did you really use the same password on more than one site?

60 Sec Security - 15 Feb 2014

Revamping an old technology to go where GPS signals cannot reach

Maze. Image courtesy of Shutterstock.

Illegal GPS jammers, sold cheap online, can endanger space stations and ship navigation, not to mention potentially preventing emergency calls or keeping rescue teams from homing in on injured people. But recently, a new version of an old, longwave technology, eLORAN, is showing great promise in jamming the jammers.

Flappy Bird really *is* dead - beware of infected fakes that promise to keep him alive!

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News about celebrities to do with births, deaths and marriages often prove to be handy hooks for cybercrooks.

So when the ultra-popular game Flappy Bird was withdrawn recently, the crooks wasted no time pretending to keep him alive...