Privacy

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Facebook's Sheryl Sandberg: targeted ads don't trample on privacy

Sheryl Sandberg

Facebook Bigwig Sheryl Sandberg wants us all to know that, targeted advertising or no, the Zuckerbergians are hovering over our private data like an anxious mother bird protecting her fluffy nestlings from voracious advertising raptors.

Dutch student sells online soul at auction for €350

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Shawn Buckles has sold bucket-loads of his online data in a Faustian bargain with the highest bidder, intended to prove a point about loss of privacy in the age of big data. But what about the privacy rights of everyone he's emailed in the past?

Facial recognition - coming soon to a shopping mall near you

Facial recognition - coming soon to a shopping mall near you

Forget monitoring customers' smartphones. Technology giant NEC's Hong Kong branch is promoting a small, "easy to install" appliance which will enable businesses to monitor their customers based on facial recognition.

Monday review - the hot 21 stories of the week

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It's weekly roundup time!

Here's all the great stuff we've written in the past seven days.

Heartbleed bust, Fingerprint fakery, WhatsApp privacy SNAFU - 60 Sec Security [VIDEO]

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What happens if you hack your local tax office? Can you trust the Samsung Galaxy S5's fingerprint security? Did WhatsApp finally get security right in its app?

Find out the answers in one entertaining minute of video - it's 60 Second Security!

Massive FBI facial recognition database raises privacy fears

Facial recognition. Image courtesy of Shutterstock.

The FBI is building a massive facial recognition database that could contain as many as 52 million images by 2015, including 4.3 million non-criminal images, according to information obtained by the EFF via a freedom of information request.

Heartbleed jabs its first victims: UK parents' site Mumsnet, Canadian tax agency

Heartbleed jabs its first victims: UK parents' site Mumsnet, Canadian tax agency

Two high-profile organisations, the UK parenting site Mumsnet and the Canada Revenue Agency, are the first known victims of the Heartbleed OpenSSL vulnerability to experience data breaches.

WhatsApp, Facebook get a privacy finger wagged at them by FTC

WhatApp, Facebook get a privacy finger wagged at them by FTC

The Commission suggests that, post-mega-acquisition (which has been OKed), WhatsApp should get users' permission before changing data collection.

Heartbleed, Google Play and XP - 60 Sec Security [VIDEO]

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How hard is Heartbleed recovery? How hard does Google Play try to keep the garbage out? And how hard are you trying to get over XP?

60 Second Security has the answers in a short, fun security video.

In-flight WiFi providers go above and beyond to help feds spy on us

In-flight WiFi providers go above and beyond to help feds spy on us

Documents have come to light in which Gogo brags about how it not only complies with a federal law for compliance with law enforcement; it actually goes above and beyond requirements to give law enforcement extra special surveillance sauce, it says. And it's not the only one...

SSCC 142 - Heartbleed explained, Patches assessed, Apple chastised [PODCAST]

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Chet and Duck explain what you can do about the big ticket security news items of the past week.

The epic "Heartbleed" bug in OpenSSL, the last patches ever for XP and Office 2003, and Apple's attitude to updates and support all come under the microscope.

Facebook will show more on-screen privacy setting explanations

Facebook will show more on-screen privacy setting explanations

Facebook admitted that users are confused about privacy. Between a blue privacy dinosaur who's already popping up to remind us to check privacy settings and upcoming on-screen explanations of who's seeing what when we share, we'll all be a bit less muddled.

Facebook data scraped, people profiled as "jerks" and scammed by Jerk.com, FTC says

Jerk. Image courtesy of Shutterstock.

Jerk.com allegedly scraped content from people's Facebook listings, put it up on its site, invited the world to throw rotten fruit at by clicking on a "jerk" or "not a jerk" button, and then had the outrageously uber-jerky jerkiness to charge people $30 to be able to (supposedly but not really) dispute.

The 'Privacy Dinosaur' urges Facebook users to check their privacy settings

The 'Privacy Dinosaur' urges Facebook users to check their privacy settings

Users who haven't adjusted their privacy settings will see the experimental dino-message whenever they attempt to share a status update, link or photo that would otherwise be visible to everyone, hopefully eliminating accidental public postings.

Google drives the Street View snooping scandal up to the Supreme Court

Google drives the StreetView snooping scandal up to the Supreme Court

Google's asking the high court to rule on the legality of its past snorting of unencrypted WiFi traffic in neighborhoods around the US.

SellHack browser plugin ceases squeezing LinkedIn for hidden email addresses

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The free extension promised to "hack" LinkedIn profiles to get at what should be users' tucked-away, private email addresses. Much to LinkedIn's chagrin, it was doing just that (albeit spottily) until it got LinkedIn's cease and desist order, took the plugin offline and pledged to shape it into something that passes terms of service muster.

James Clapper confirms that NSA conducted warrantless searches on Americans

James Clapper confirms that NSA conducted warrantless searches on Americans

In a letter to Congress released on Tuesday, the US government confirmed what we all knew (or at least suspected) – the National Security Agency has conducted warrantless searches on Americans' private telephone and email conversations.

Dropbox says it isn't poking around in our stuff

Dropbox says it isn't poking around in our stuff

"We don’t look at the files in your private folders and are committed to keeping your stuff safe", the company said in the wake of an internet freakout sparked by a user finding himself unable to share copyrighted content. Time to relax, or time to consider encrypting your files before they get to Dropbox (or any other cloud storage)?

Google Glass recording without permission could become illegal in Australia

Google Glass recording without permission could become illegal in Australia

The country's considering an overhaul of privacy laws that could make it illegal to record private conversations or activities without consent via Google Glass or similar wearable technologies.