Privacy

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1,000,000 lost credit cards = £150,000 fine

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A UK travel company has been fined £150,000 for putting an "internal only" parking database system on the internet without securing it first.

The vulnerable system was used as a stepping stone for a crook to steal more than 1M e-commerce records.

Panopticlick reveals the cookie you can't delete

Panopticlick reveals the cookie you can't delete

You know about cookies, and how to delete them, but what if there was a cookie you couldn't delete, and what if the steps you took to guard your privacy made you easier to track? The EFF's Panopticlick tool determines how easy you are to identify based on your web browser's 'fingerprint'.

Sony offers games as part of $15m Playstation Network breach settlement

Sony hacking suspect smashes computers to get out of prosecution

Sony has offered gamers digital goods as part of a $15m settlement in the 2011 PlayStation Network (PSN) data breach case.

Google given 18 months to change its handling of user data

Google Italy

The Italian Data Protection Commissioner has given Google 18 months to change the way it treats and stores user data.

Your Gmail account is fair game for cops or feds, says US judge

US judge: your Gmail account is fair game for cops or feds

A New York court on Thursday opened up our entire Gmail accounts to feds or cops with warrants, in spite of two recent decisions that went against similar requests.

New search engine Indexeus unmasks malicious hackers

New search engine Indexeus unmasks malicious hackers

Indexeus is a database of stolen names and passwords, many doxed from the hackers who've themselves doxed others' data. Is it poetic justice, exploitation of a lucrative market, a prototype of an educational tool, or all of the above?

Which web browser do you trust the most? [POLL]

Browser Trust Poll

The web browser could be considered the most important piece of software we use on a daily basis, which is why a relationship of trust comes into play - we rely on our browser to secure our communications, data and privacy.

So, take our poll, and tell us which browser you trust the most ...

Bing follows Google by offering 'right to be forgotten' form

Bing follows Google by offering ‘right to be forgotten’ form

It's unclear whether Microsoft will take a similar approach to Google in the way it handles Bing search results. The situation certainly needs clarification and the big 3 search engines have been invited to meet with EU privacy regulators next Thursday to discuss how the ruling should be implemented.

Introducing Jibo: adorable home robot or the Eye of Sauron?

Introducing Jibo: adorable home robot or the Eye of Sauron?

Launched by famed MIT Media Labs roboticist Cynthia Breazeal, he's poised to smile, dance, and giggle his way into our hearts, our homes, and hopefully not into the lucrative position of pawning data about where we like to shop.

Google+ drops real name policy. What do you think? [POLL]

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Following years of criticism, Google announced on Tuesday that it is waving goodbye to the real names policy it employed to block the use of pseudonyms on its Google+ social network.

'Hidden from Google' site remembers the pages Google's forced to forget

'Hidden from Google" site remembers the pages Google's forced to forget

The newly launched site is archiving the pages Google was forced to de-index in the name of opening up to the internet as a whole the discussion regarding what should or should not be "forgotten."

SSCC 156 - Warbiking in Manhattan, hubris for Google, and how less can be more [PODCAST]

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Sophos experts Chester Wisniewski and Paul Ducklin are back with this week's security podcast, turning plain old news into advice you can use.

Germany considers replacing email with typewriters to evade spying

Germany to replace email with typewriters to duck US spying?

The country's pondering manual typewriters, however, unlike Russia's reported embrace of electric typewriters last year. Russia should be well aware that you can plug a keylogger into those e-typewriters, given that it pulled that stunt on IBM Selectrics back in the 70s!

Tor Project is NOT getting sued for enabling revenge porn site PinkMeth

Tor Project is NOT getting sued for enabling revenge porn site PinkMeth

A Texas revenge-porn victim is suing the operators of revenge-porn site PinkMeth.com and was (until her lawyer figured out just what, exactly, the anonymising service Tor actually is) suing The Tor Project for helping PinkMeth to operate anonymously.

UK to rush through "emergency" phone and internet data retention law

UK to rush through "emergency" phone and internet data retention law

The UK is rushing through Parliament what it calls an emergency law that will ensure it retains access to people's phone and internet records, in spite of the European Court of Justice having said in April that data retention violates human rights. It's not a rehash of the Snooper's Charter, politicians claim, but there's not a lot of time to eyeball it to make sure that's true.

SSCC 155 - cybercrime bust, cloud laws, phishing and malware back from extinction [PODCAST]

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In this episode, Sophos experts John Shier and Paul Ducklin tackle the week's interesting security stories.

John and Duck get stuck into: a high-profile cybercrime arrest; how mainstream brands help phishers; and why macro malware is making a comeback.

What would make you quit Facebook? Here's what you said ...

Quit Facebook?

Last week we asked our readers to take a poll about Facebook's controversial social experiment on thousands of unknowing users.

Lots of you responded - more than 1,000 - and we received a lot of great comments. Here's what you said ...

DARPA dissects Twitter, Facebook, Reddit to extract propaganda how-to's

DARPA

The internet found out last week that Facebook's been dissecting us. Now, it looks like DARPA's been at it too, with research on users of Facebook, Twitter, Reddit, Pinterest, Kickstarter and Digg.