Privacy

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Australian police using tower dumps to slurp mass phone data

Australian police using tower dumps to slurp mass phone data

Australian federal and state police have joined the ranks of mega-data slurpers - namely, the US, where 1 in 4 law enforcement agencies have reportedly used a "tower dump" - ordering phone providers to hand over personal information about thousands of mobile phone users, regardless of whether or not those people are under investigation.

Holiday snaps and nuclear intel: The NSA's data capture exposed

NSA catches only 10% of data legally, but is it a fair trade off?

That leaves large-scale privacy invasion on 90% of 160,000 analysed messages swept up illegally by the NSA. But credit where credit is due: the legal 10% of intercepts have significant intelligence value, including data about a secret overseas nuclear project and double-dealing by an ostensible ally.

Student jailed for refusing to hand over password to police

Student jailed for refusing to hand over password to police

Christopher Wilson, who has his own business programming artificial intelligence systems, is suspected of hacking into police websites and using a voice-changing device to make hoax telephone calls warning of a cyber attack. When detectives asked Wilson to reveal his computer password to aid in their investigation he refused.

Is Apple slack at security on iOS? 60 Sec Security [VIDEO]

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What went wrong with PayPal's 2FA? Why did Microsoft do an email U-turn? Is Apple slack at security on iOS?

It'll only take a minute to find out...

SSCC 154: Fraud, viruses, patches and encryption (in that order!) [PODCAST]

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Where does your country sit on the fraud list? Just how much can you trust SMSes on Android? Is Apple serious enough about iOS security? And will Google's End-To-End email encryption plugin save the world?

Find out with Chet and Duck in this week's Chet Chat podcast...

Facebook's experiment on users - what would it take for you to finally quit? [POLL]

Facebook's experiment on users - what would it take for you to finally quit? [POLL]

Facebook is taking heat once again for perceived invasion of privacy, after it disclosed a research experiment conducted on users without their explicit consent.

What do you think? Have you finally had enough of Facebook's privacy invasions to say "enough is enough"? Take our poll...

EFF sues NSA over hoarding of zero days

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Wouldn't it be nice to know just how, exactly, the spy agency decides whether to silently exploit zero days for snooping purposes while leaving businesses and individuals in the dark with their bellies exposed? The EFF has filed a FOIA lawsuit to help find answers.

Supreme Court refuses to drag Google out of its Street View privacy wreckage

Supreme Court won't drag Google out of its Street View privacy wreckage

Google's planning to slurp up ever more data, from wearables, fitness apps and more. It sure would be nice for Google if the Street View fiasco would fade away and stop reminding people of how they snooped on data and then lied about it, but the Supreme Court isn't disposed to helping it out on this one.

Ex-boyfriend avoids jail for posting offensive update on woman's Facebook account

Smartphone. Image courtesy of Shutterstock

The case - one which involves prosecution over damage to a social media account - is reportedly unprecedented. The guilty party was facing a maximum of 10 years in prison and a €10,000 fine, with a judge who had no precedents to go on when it came time for sentencing.

Google looks to make OpenPGP easier for Gmail users

Google switches Gmail to HTTPS only

In early June Google announced a new project designed to create a Chrome plugin to allow end-to-end encryption of web-based emails using OpenPGP. We take a look at its current state and explain how it works.

4 password mistakes small companies make and how to avoid them

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When it comes to IT security very small businesses and micro-enterprises are in a tight spot. We've compiled a list of four common password mistakes - if you can avoid them then you'll have put your security on a stronger footing.

Facebook's facing a losing battle to protect users' privacy

Facebook's facing a losing battle to protect users' privacy

Last year, prosecutors in Manhattan held Facebook up by the ankles and shook out personal data on 381 users. A judge last week said that it's up to the targeted users to complain about privacy invasion, not data-repository Facebook. But how are they supposed to stand up for their rights if they're never told about the sealed warrants to begin with?

Canadian spam, New York taxis and Brazilian passwords - 60 Sec Security [VIDEO]

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Canada goes "opt in", NYC makes a hash, and Brazil forgets its punctuation.

It's 60 Second Security for 28 June 2014!

Revenge porn hits two high profile boyfriends where it hurts

Voodoo doll. Image courtesy of Shutterstock

Former NSA analyst and vocal NSA supporter John Schindler had his pink parts exposed by a lover in an extramarital affair, and a state representative's chief of staff was outed by a porn star ex-girlfriend and subsequently resigned. Revenge porn might typically target women, but these cases clearly show that we're all vulnerable when it comes to sharing explicit content.

Is that Google Glass wearer stealing your iPad passcode?

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What about the one with a smartwatch? Snoopers can catch your code from nearly 10 feet away with Google Glass or Samsung's smartwatch and from almost 150 away using a HD camcorder, thanks to researchers' custom-coded, shadow-tracking recognition algorithm.

Cupid Media "breached Privacy act" after storing users' passwords in plain text

Heart. Image courtesy of Shutterstock.

The Australian Privacy Commissioner has ruled that Cupid Media Pty Ltd breached the Privacy Act following a data breach which saw over 40 million customer records exposed.

hitchBOT - Privacy invading hitchhiking robot or fun social experiment?

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Introducing hitchBOT, a science meets art project, getting ready to hitch 6158 km across Canada from Halifax to Victoria next month.

World Cup security well executed if you don't count the Wi-Fi

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The company providing security for one of the World Cup venues in Brazil accidentally posted a photo containing the secret Wi-Fi password. Does it really matter? Was it even a secret to begin with?

New York City makes a hash of taxi driver data disclosure

What do you do in your spare time if you're a self-confessed "urbanist, data junkie and civic hacker," like New York resident Chris Whong?

Use Freedom of Information Laws to find out more about NYC's taxi movements, of course...

BoringSSL wants to kill the excitement that led to Heartbleed

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Some things just aren't meant to be exciting. In fact some things are supposed to be so far from novelty, surprise and frivolity that any whiff of excitement at all is a bad sign indeed. Introducing Boring SSL...