Banking Trojan

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Notorious Shylock banking malware taken out by law enforcement

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Law enforcement action led by the National Crime Agency (NCA) in the UK has knocked out the infrastructure of a banking malware known as Shylock, because of excerpts from Shakespeare's Merchant of Venice hidden in its code.

Here's how to check to make sure you weren't among the more than 30,000 PCs that were infected.

Smucker's online store gets stuck in thieves' web

Smucker's online store gets stuck in thieves' web

The US jam and jelly maker is just the latest fly to get stuck in the same web that ensnared dozens of companies last year, including some of the world's largest data brokers and at least one credit card processor.

Android banking malware with a twist in the delivery

Here's an intriguing tale of an Android malware curveball spotted recently in SophosLabs.

You're expecting the pitch to come at you in a predictable direction, but a hidden twist in the action brings the onslaught from another angle altogether...

Alleged "SpyEye" mastermind extradited to US

Alleged "SpyEye" mastermind extradited to US

The FBI suspects that 24-year-old Hamza Bendelladj, an Algerian national, developed, marketed, distributed and controlled the notorious botnet toolkit, used to steal millions of dollars from online bank accounts.

Ukrainian and Russian police arrest banking Trojan masterminds

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Ukrainian newspaper Kommersant reported on a joint operation by the Ukrainian and Russian federal police arresting 20 people allegedly behind the Carberp banking malware. Is this a sign that we may see more arrests by the FSB and SBU in the future?

Carberp gang arrested in Russia after victimizing Russians

Carberp gang arrested in Russia after victimizing Russians

Russian authorities have arrested eight men in Moscow in connection with running a malware network deployed to commit banking fraud against its citizens. Lesson learned? It's only OK to steal from other countries.

Compromised website used in Bank of America phish

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In malware analysis, it is quite common to come across attacks that you quite simply cannot believe could really work. I quite often find myself asking the question how anyone could actually fall victim to that? Yesterday, one of my colleagues was analyzing a banking Trojan that provided just such a case.

The Code is dead. Long live the Code!

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Three years ago internet banking Trojans, along with their associated downloader Trojans, began to proliferate: samples started flooding in by the thousands. The poor way to deal with these would be to wait for them to come in then issue thousands of specific Read more…

All your Bank are belong to us

All your Bank are belong to us

Banker Trojans are rife and popular with the 'easy money' crowd of malware authors, though stealing banking information is not without its hazards. It takes a very smart (or a very stupid) person to pull off such a caper without Read more…