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Syrian Electronic Army hacks Forbes, spills 1M user records - here's what you need to know

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The SEA made off with more than a million records from the Forbes user database - perhaps including yours! - and published them online.

We already "cracked" a quarter of the Forbes staffer's accounts...Paul Ducklin looks at how well everyone else's password might hold up.

Chaos Computer Club claims to have "cracked" the iPhone 5s fingerprint sensor

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The biometrics team of Germany's well-known Chaos Computer Club claims it has "cracked" Apple's Touch ID system.

From a fingerprint left on glass, the team claims to have used a technique documented by the CCC back in 2004 to produce a "fake finger."

Win Bitcoins, booze and cash! Be the first to crack the iPhone's Touch ID fingerprint sensor...

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Numerous individuals have so far pledged Bitcoins, booze, cash, and more if you can clone someone's fingerprint and unlock an iPhone 5s.

You're allowed to use your own fingerprint, to make experimenting easier...so, go on! What are you waiting for?

Android security fail, Cryptocat tartan, Nintendo crack - 60 Sec Security [VIDEO]

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Are cryptographic holes the new buffer overflows?

Take a look at this week's 60 Second Security video and let us know what you think!

LinkedIn unhacked, Microsoft bounties, Java in your browser - 60 Sec Security [VIDEO]

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It's that time again - time for this week's 60 Second Security, our fun-but serious "security news with a conscience" video series.

Give it a spin...it'll only take a minute.

Anatomy of a cryptoglitch - Apple's iOS hotspot passphrases crackable in 50 seconds

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If you use your iPhone or iPad as a Wi-Fi hotspot, don't let it generate the passphrase for you.

A posse of German computer scientists has found that Apple's iOS passphrase generator may give you less than a minute of security.

Mega's bug bounty program - one week down, "a few billion billion years" to go

Mega, the cloud storage service brought to you by Kim Dotcom, has released the first feedback on its bug bounty program.

It's only a week in, so the major prizes haven't been scooped yet...and Mega's saying they'll be safe for "a few billion billion years" yet.

Boffins 'crack' HTTPS encryption in Lucky Thirteen attack

The security of web transactions is again in the spotlight as a pair of UK cryptographers take aim at TLS.

Like 2011's much-talked-about BEAST attack, it has a groovy name: Lucky Thirteen.

Boutique babycare website hack - not just the Big Guys at risk

Even if you run a tiny website and don't have much to hide, you (and your customers) are nevertheless at risk from criminals.

For example, @JokerCracker, who openly gives his reason for hacking as, "It's just a personal challenge".

Cracked passwords from the alleged 'Egyptian hacker' Adobe breach

Cracked passwords from the alleged 'Egyptian hacker' Adobe breach

An allegedly Egyptian hacker going by the name ViruS_HimA has allegedly hacked into Adobe.

Wherever the data actually comes from, it reveals yet more poor password hygiene at both the client and the server...find out just how bad.

Cracking passwords from the Philips hack - an important lesson

Cracking the passwords from the Philips hack - an important lesson [INFOGRAPHICS]

Cracking the password hashes exposed in the recent Philips data breach was interesting, but there was just as much to be learned from the rate of recovery as from the password recovery itself.

We've prepared some mini-infographics to show you what we mean...

Researchers take another crack at SSL

Researchers take another crack at SSL

Just how unique is is your private key?

Is there a chance that someone else, without any malice aforethought, might unexpectedly end up with a key pair that is identical or at least dangerously similar to yours?

WikiLeaks, Gawker, OpenBSD, Lineage II - 90 Sec News - Dec 2010

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Don't just read the latest computer security news - watch it in 90 seconds!

This month: the WikiLeaks show, massive Gawker password theft, an out-of-the-blue OpenBSD accusation, and virtual property stolen from Lineage II.

SHA-1 cracked for $2. Or a load of rubbish?

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We're into the back end of November, so you were probably thinking that nothing would have time to oust Stuxnet as computer security hyperbole of the year.

Seems you were wrong. The security news wires are abuzz with a new story.