NSA

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iSpy? Researcher exposes backdoor in iPhones and iPads

iphone. Image courtesy of st.djura/Shutterstock.

A "backdoor" that Apple built into iOS for developers can be used to spy on iPhones and iPads by governments, law enforcement, or cyber criminals, according to forensics researcher Jonathan Zdziarski.

Germany considers replacing email with typewriters to evade spying

Germany to replace email with typewriters to duck US spying?

The country's pondering manual typewriters, however, unlike Russia's reported embrace of electric typewriters last year. Russia should be well aware that you can plug a keylogger into those e-typewriters, given that it pulled that stunt on IBM Selectrics back in the 70s!

US arrests Russian MP's son for PoS hacking; Russia calls it kidnapping

US arrests Russian MP's son for PoS hacking; Russia calls it kidnapping

The Russian man's father conjectures that, for all he knows, this may be a ploy for the US to get bait to exchange for Snowden.

Holiday snaps and nuclear intel: The NSA's data capture exposed

NSA catches only 10% of data legally, but is it a fair trade off?

That leaves large-scale privacy invasion on 90% of 160,000 analysed messages swept up illegally by the NSA. But credit where credit is due: the legal 10% of intercepts have significant intelligence value, including data about a secret overseas nuclear project and double-dealing by an ostensible ally.

EFF sues NSA over hoarding of zero days

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Wouldn't it be nice to know just how, exactly, the spy agency decides whether to silently exploit zero days for snooping purposes while leaving businesses and individuals in the dark with their bellies exposed? The EFF has filed a FOIA lawsuit to help find answers.

US House votes "overwhelmingly" to cut funding of NSA surveillance

NSA surveillance funding cuts OKed by US House

A strong majority of the US House have voted to cut funding for surveillance on citizens or for planting backdoors that let the government slip past encryption that's supposed to shield communications.

Here's what bugging your own office NSA-style can reveal

Eavesdropping. Image courtesy of Shutterstock.

A US reporter for National Public Radio found that NSA-style broad surveillance enabled by a pen-testing device and software crunching picked up on his research (in spite of Google's default search encryption), intercepted uncut interview tape, ferreted out his interview subjects' phone numbers and email addresses, and more.

Snowden, one year on, and it's still not 1984

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It's a year since Snowden lifted the lid on PRISM and everything that followed. We've spent a year looking for Big Brother while we uploaded more of our lives into the care of giant media corporations and pointed an ever increasing battery of cameras at each other.

What we learned from Edward Snowden

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Tapping the conversations of world leaders, facial recognition, PRISM, Tempura, Upstream, XKeyscore... Whether you think Snowden's a hero or a traitor, there's no denying that revelations about widespread spying by the NSA keep pouring out. One year on from the first leak, we thought we'd take a look back at what we've learned.

Google says half of email is sent unencrypted

Open padlock. Image courtesy of Shutterstock.

It's been an encryption-intensive start to the week - good news for all of us who are wary of snooping.

Fight internet surveillance, Reset The Net

Reset The Net

5 June 2014 is Reset The Net. It's a day to take back our privacy by using strong encryption whenever and wherever we can and insisting that the organisations we rely upon do too.

NSA facial recognition program scours web for images to identify suspects

NSA facial recognition program scours web for images to identify suspects

The US National Security Agency (NSA) has been collecting millions of images from the web and storing them in a database that can be mined by facial recognition software for identifying surveillance targets, a new report says.

NSA intercepts routers, servers to slip in backdoors for overseas surveillance

Spying. Image courtesy of Shutterstock.

US intelligence has been covertly implanting interception tools into US networking equipment heading overseas, alleges Glenn Greenwald.

Monday review - the hot 21 stories of the week

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It's weekly roundup time!

Here's all the great stuff we've written in the past seven days.

US House committee unanimously votes to rein in NSA, end bulk data collection

Spy. Image courtesy of Shutterstock.

The USA Freedom Act is a watered-down version of an earlier bill - it's been re-dubbed the "Freedumb Act" - and it's seen as a weakened compromise between the intelligence community and those concerned with people's rights not to be snooped on. But hey, privacy groups say, it's still a step in the right direction.

Canadian ISPs 'boomerang routing' traffic through the snoopy US

Canadian ISPs 'boomerang routing' traffic through the snoopy US

A new report on carriers and transparency found that the country's internet lords aren't being upfront about shuffling intra-Canadian traffic through the US, which means that data resides where the NSA can get its hands on it and Canadian privacy laws don't pertain.

Monday review - the hot 21 stories of the week

dow-250

It's weekly roundup time!

Here's all the great stuff we've written in the past seven days.

Obama leaves loophole open for NSA to exploit zero-day vulnerabilities

Obama leaves loophole open for NSA to exploit zero-day vulnerabilities

No, the US White House didn't know about Heartbleed and didn't exploit the OpenSSL bug to snoop, it said, but it's reserving the prerogative to use zero-day exploits as a wedge to pry out intelligence if it serves national security interests.

James Clapper confirms that NSA conducted warrantless searches on Americans

James Clapper confirms that NSA conducted warrantless searches on Americans

In a letter to Congress released on Tuesday, the US government confirmed what we all knew (or at least suspected) – the National Security Agency has conducted warrantless searches on Americans' private telephone and email conversations.

Transatlantic cables will bypass USA to avoid NSA spying

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EU says "A new fibre-optic submarine cable, connecting Latin America directly with Europe" will "enhance data protection". Is NSA evasion really the reason for new undersea cable projects wrapping around the globe?