surveillance

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Head of 'StealthGenie' mobile stalking app indicted for selling spyware

Stealth Genie

The indictment alleges that StealthGenie can and has recorded all incoming/outgoing voice calls; intercepted calls to be monitored in real time; allowed the buyer to call the phone and activate it at any time to monitor all surrounding conversations within a 15-foot radius; and allowed the buyer to monitor a target's incoming and outgoing e-mail messages and SMS messages, incoming voicemail messages, address book, calendar, photographs, and videos—all without the knowledge of the phone's user.

Tor users could be FBI's main target if legal power grab succeeds

Tor users could be FBI's main target if legal power grab succeeds

The US Department of Justice is proposing a power grab that would make it easier for domestic law enforcement to break into computers of people trying to protect their anonymity via Tor or other anonymizing technologies.

US government "threatened" Yahoo with daily $250,000 fines over user data

Yahoo. Image courtesy of Ken Wolter/Shutterstock

In the post-Snowden era many web firms came in for criticism over their apparent willingness to bend over for the NSA as the agency went on a massive data grab. Now, however, Yahoo has revealed how much it would have cost the company to disregard government data requests – a cool quarter of a million dollars per day.

Social media users don't like discussing Snowden and surveillance online

Silence. Image courtesy of Shutterstock

Just 42% of those surveyed said they were willing to air their views or enter a discussion on Facebook or Twitter but 86% said they would be happy to discuss the NSA surveillance program in a face-to-face setting.

How will you pay for the internet of the future?

How will you pay for the internet of the future?

In this, the 25th year anniversary of the invention of the World Wide Web, the man who claims to have invented the pop-up ad and gave rise to an economy of surveillance has apologized, said that the consequences were unforeseen, and invited the world's citizens to re-imagine a different web.

Snowden: NSA working on 'MonsterMind' cyberwar bot

Snowden: NSA working on 'MonsterMind' cyberwar bot

The cyber defense system would instantly and autonomously neutralize foreign cyberattacks against the US and could also be used to launch retaliatory strikes. To do so, it would have to control and analyze all traffic entering the US - a chilling prospect that was the last straw, the whistleblower says.

Apple iPads and MacBook Pros banned for Chinese government use

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China has banned government officials from buying Apple products, reportedly to avoid the possibility of the US hijacking the technology to spy on Beijing.

Evidence of another Snowden-like mole is worrying Feds

Evidence of another Snowden-like mole is worrying Feds

The US government has been trying to answer a crucial question: is Snowden a lone wolf, or are other Edward Snowdens out there, leaking ever more classified documents?

Given new leaks published by Glenn Greenwald's The Intercept, the Feds now fear they have their answer, and it is in the affirmative.

Potato chips: Big Brother's next eavesdropping tool?

Potato chips: Big Brother's next eavesdropping tool?

A team of researchers from MIT, Microsoft and Adobe have figured out how to use sound vibrations in objects that are quivering too imperceptibly for the naked eye to discern, but when captured on video can be used to decipher intelligible speech.

Apple faces class action suit for tracking users without consent

Apple faces class action suit over location tracking

A Californian plaintiff says that nobody at Apple ever told her about tracking her whereabouts, nor did anybody ever ask for her permission. She says she only found out about it by watching a recent Chinese state TV report about iPhone being a security risk to the state.

Beefed-up Senate bill takes a swing at the NSA

NSA spyglass. Image courtesy of Shutterstock

If it emerges unscathed from the chamber, it could mean an end to bulk metadata collection, an end to the secrecy the government's been operating under, and reform of the USA Patriot Act that's been used to grant it vast surveillance rights.

Germany considers replacing email with typewriters to evade spying

Germany to replace email with typewriters to duck US spying?

The country's pondering manual typewriters, however, unlike Russia's reported embrace of electric typewriters last year. Russia should be well aware that you can plug a keylogger into those e-typewriters, given that it pulled that stunt on IBM Selectrics back in the 70s!

iPhones are a security threat to the state, China claims

iPhone's a security threat to the state, China claims

China has cited Apple iPhone's ability to track and time-stamp users' whereabouts as reason to declare the mobile phone hazardous to state security.

UK to rush through "emergency" phone and internet data retention law

UK to rush through "emergency" phone and internet data retention law

The UK is rushing through Parliament what it calls an emergency law that will ensure it retains access to people's phone and internet records, in spite of the European Court of Justice having said in April that data retention violates human rights. It's not a rehash of the Snooper's Charter, politicians claim, but there's not a lot of time to eyeball it to make sure that's true.

Australian police using tower dumps to slurp mass phone data

Australian police using tower dumps to slurp mass phone data

Australian federal and state police have joined the ranks of mega-data slurpers - namely, the US, where 1 in 4 law enforcement agencies have reportedly used a "tower dump" - ordering phone providers to hand over personal information about thousands of mobile phone users, regardless of whether or not those people are under investigation.

Holiday snaps and nuclear intel: The NSA's data capture exposed

NSA catches only 10% of data legally, but is it a fair trade off?

That leaves large-scale privacy invasion on 90% of 160,000 analysed messages swept up illegally by the NSA. But credit where credit is due: the legal 10% of intercepts have significant intelligence value, including data about a secret overseas nuclear project and double-dealing by an ostensible ally.

Monday review - the hot 22 stories of the week

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It's weekly roundup time!

Here's all the great stuff we've written in the past seven days.

EFF sues NSA over hoarding of zero days

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Wouldn't it be nice to know just how, exactly, the spy agency decides whether to silently exploit zero days for snooping purposes while leaving businesses and individuals in the dark with their bellies exposed? The EFF has filed a FOIA lawsuit to help find answers.

Facebook's facing a losing battle to protect users' privacy

Facebook's facing a losing battle to protect users' privacy

Last year, prosecutors in Manhattan held Facebook up by the ankles and shook out personal data on 381 users. A judge last week said that it's up to the targeted users to complain about privacy invasion, not data-repository Facebook. But how are they supposed to stand up for their rights if they're never told about the sealed warrants to begin with?