warrantless search

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Australian police using tower dumps to slurp mass phone data

Australian police using tower dumps to slurp mass phone data

Australian federal and state police have joined the ranks of mega-data slurpers - namely, the US, where 1 in 4 law enforcement agencies have reportedly used a "tower dump" - ordering phone providers to hand over personal information about thousands of mobile phone users, regardless of whether or not those people are under investigation.

Facebook's facing a losing battle to protect users' privacy

Facebook's facing a losing battle to protect users' privacy

Last year, prosecutors in Manhattan held Facebook up by the ankles and shook out personal data on 381 users. A judge last week said that it's up to the targeted users to complain about privacy invasion, not data-repository Facebook. But how are they supposed to stand up for their rights if they're never told about the sealed warrants to begin with?

US court finds warrantless tracking of mobile phones unconstitutional

US court finds warrantless tracking of mobile phones unconstitutional

In what the ACLU calls a "huge victory", an appeals court on Wednesday ruled that such warrantless search violates the US Constitution.

Feds argue for warrantless phone search to avoid suspects kill-switching evidence

Criminal. Image courtesy of Shutterstock.

For a long time, the law has been demanding kill-switch technology as a way to thwart mobile phone theft. But in a recent brief to the Supreme Court, the DOJ cares much more about grabbing evidence before a suspect bricks or wipes his phone.

Grassroots campaign seeks to fry the NSA by turning off the water tap

Grassroots campaign seeks to fry the NSA by turning off the water tap

It takes a lot of water to cool the spy agency's supercomputers, plus a lot of electricity. Two 4th Amendment-focused nonprofits are putting forth a template for a bill that would enable US states to turn off the lights and the taps and thereby, basically, starve the agency of the juice it needs to run.

Privacy's gone when posting child abuse images to a P2P network, US judge rules

Privacy's gone when posting child abuse images to a P2P network, US judge rules

A US court has turned the tables on child predators who use technology to share images of the abuse, ruling that investigators' use of an automated search tool to ferret out known child porn images was not a violation of the defendants' Fourth Amendment rights against unreasonable search.