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Twitter threatens revenge porn posters with account locking and suspension

Twitter. Image courtesy of 360b/Shutterstock.

Twitter says it will lock accounts of users who post intimate content without subjects' permission, until the offending material's deleted, and might suspend accounts if the intent is harassment.

Facebook to let marketers see what people are talking about

Facebook. Image courtesy of Bloomua / Shutterstock.com

Pick your marketing keyword. Example: "frizz." Facebook's ready to offer (anonymised) data to the anti-frizz marketers about who's saying what.

Android Lollipop 5.1 brings promised anti-theft "kill switch"

Android kill switch

Android Lollipop 5.1 is out for some Nexus phones, and it comes with an anti-theft kill switch. Now you can use Android Device Protection to freeze your phone if it’s lost or stolen.

As easy as 123: Xen hypervisor bug found, fixed, phew...‏make sure you're patched!

Xen is often used to share one physical server amongst many different customers - and it's supposed to keep them safely apart.

Sometimes, things don't quite work out...Paul Ducklin explains.

Wikimedia joins forces with others to sue NSA, DOJ over mass surveillance

Wikimedia sues NSA, DOJ to stop spying

The ACLU has filed a suit on behalf of rights groups against the NSA's spying program - in particular, its large-scale search and seizure of internet communications, commonly referred to as upstream surveillance.

Armed robber caught after boasting about planned stick-up on Facebook

Helpful robber boasts about planned stick-up on Facebook

A man was caught trying to rob a Tesco grocery store 15 minutes after posting his plan onto Facebook.

Three charged over largest email hack "in the history of the internet"

Three charged over largest email hack "in the history of the internet"

Two Vietnamese citizens and a Canadian have been indicted over a series of breaches that netted more than $2 million, and over a billion email addresses.

Canada's anti-spam law gets first success with $1.1m fine

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Canada's fledgling anti-spam laws have brought their first success, with a $1.1 million fine levied against a Canadian business training firm.

Monday review - the hot 25 stories of the week

Monday review

Catch up with the hot stories of the past week...

...and why not try out our weekly podcast and watch our 60-second video while you're about it?

The FREAK bug in TLS/SSL - what you need to know

The FREAK bug affects TLS/SSL, the security protocol that puts the S into HTTPS and the padlock in your browser's address bar.

Paul Ducklin explains in plain English...

Uber subpoenas GitHub in search for hacker of driver database

Image of magnifying glass over fingerprint courtesy of Shutterstock.

A breach of one of its databases in May 2014, in which the names and driver license numbers of 50,000 "driver partners" were stolen, is the latest entry on Uber's growing list privacy and security blunders.

Anatomy of a certificate problem - the "PrivDog" software in the spotlight

The bug's now fixed, but when software offers to make your secure transactions more secure...

...you don't expect things to work the other way around!

Bought PII from the government? PLEASE DON'T LOSE IT! 60 Sec Security [VIDEO]

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Here's the latest episode of our weekly computer security roundup.

The latest news presented so you can enjoy it...in just one minute!

Anthem healthcare breach is smaller - and bigger - than first thought

There's good and bad news about Anthem's recent data breach.

The bad news includes the risk to between 8.8M and 18M non-customers who were in Anthem's database anyway...

How nine out of ten healthcare pages leak private data

Medical cross. Image courtesy of Shutterstock.

A recent study has shown that nine out of ten visits to health-related web pages result in data being leaked to third parties like Google, Facebook and Experian. That's not new, so why do we care now? And how does it happen in the first place?

SSCC 187 - The cryptography edition [PODCAST]

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Sophos expert John Shier sits in for regular presenter Chester Wisniewski in this episode.

John and Paul Ducklin dissect the latest security issues, which were dominated this week by some thorny matters of cryptography.

Koppie Koppie sells photos of your kids to prove you shouldn't post them online

Image of mother and little baby taking selfie courtesy of Rasstock / Shutterstock.com.

Two "privacy advocates" running an online store that sells mugs printed with pictures of children are intentionally stirring up controversy by grabbing photos from Flickr. The duo behind Koppie Koppie say it's perfectly legal, but they hope you get mad about it anyway.

Not just celebrity nude photos, Reddit bans all "involuntary porn"

Reddit bans "Involuntary Porn": Sexual material's not OK without an OK

Reddit blew it with The Fappening, but a new privacy policy enables even us nobodies to request image removal.

LinkedIn settles class action suit over 2012 unsalted password leak

LinkedIn settles class action suit over 2012 unsalted password leak

LinkedIn is privately settling the 2012 unsalted password leak. Were you one of the 800,000 affected users? Here's what you need to know.