NSA

(get it in RSS or Atom)

A third of Americans have changed online and phone behaviours post-Snowden

A third of Americans have changed online and phone behaviours post-Snowden

Edward Snowden has been heard, and his words are having at least some effect. True, a minority have changed to better protect their privacy, but the more people know, the more likely they are to change.

Wikimedia joins forces with others to sue NSA, DOJ over mass surveillance

Wikimedia sues NSA, DOJ to stop spying

The ACLU has filed a suit on behalf of rights groups against the NSA's spying program - in particular, its large-scale search and seizure of internet communications, commonly referred to as upstream surveillance.

SSCC 188 - Live long and prosper [PODCAST]

chet-chat-logo-featured-250

Join our experts Paul Ducklin and Chester Wisniewski as they take you on a 15-minute tour of the hot topics in security this week.

Why the US was so sure North Korea hacked Sony: it had a front-row seat

US and North Korea. Image courtesy of Shutterstock.

A newly released, top-secret document traces the NSA's infiltration of North Korean systems back to 2010, when it piggybacked on South Korean "implants" on North Korea's networks and "sucked back the data".

Do terrorists use spam to shroud their secrets?

An article by an NSA mathematician about randomness also raises the question, "Are terrorists hiding behind spam?"

Schmidt: Want to keep your sensitive data away from the NSA? Use Google

Schmidt: Google's your best bet to evade the NSA

NSA spying revelations shocked Google, so it encrypted the beejezus out of everything. We'll all be dead by the time it's cracked, Schmidt said.

How have attitudes to privacy changed post-Snowden?

Survey: post-Snowden, 39% take steps to protect privacy

A recent survey reports 43% of users avoid certain websites and applications and 39% change their passwords regularly since the Snowden revelations. Is that number low, or is it an encouraging sign of growing sensitivity to privacy issues?

Senate kills bill that would have reined in NSA and rampant surveillance

USA flag. Image courtesy of Shutterstock

Yesterday the Senate axed The USA Freedom Act, which missed the chance to be debated by just two "yes" votes. With it goes what privacy advocates had called the best opportunity yet to curb the country's run-amok surveillance.

New Google transparency report details hike in government user data requests

Google

Governments around the world are demanding increasingly larger amounts of user data from search giant Google, according to the company’s latest Transparency Report.

Target tops the list of most epic privacy fails

Target privacy fail

Our readers ranked Target’s data breach ahead of Adobe, Snapchat, Google Glass, and Talking Angela for the biggest privacy failure of the past year.

US government "threatened" Yahoo with daily $250,000 fines over user data

Yahoo. Image courtesy of Ken Wolter/Shutterstock

In the post-Snowden era many web firms came in for criticism over their apparent willingness to bend over for the NSA as the agency went on a massive data grab. Now, however, Yahoo has revealed how much it would have cost the company to disregard government data requests – a cool quarter of a million dollars per day.

Social media users don't like discussing Snowden and surveillance online

Silence. Image courtesy of Shutterstock

Just 42% of those surveyed said they were willing to air their views or enter a discussion on Facebook or Twitter but 86% said they would be happy to discuss the NSA surveillance program in a face-to-face setting.

Snowden: NSA working on 'MonsterMind' cyberwar bot

Snowden: NSA working on 'MonsterMind' cyberwar bot

The cyber defense system would instantly and autonomously neutralize foreign cyberattacks against the US and could also be used to launch retaliatory strikes. To do so, it would have to control and analyze all traffic entering the US - a chilling prospect that was the last straw, the whistleblower says.

Apple iPads and MacBook Pros banned for Chinese government use

noapple-250

China has banned government officials from buying Apple products, reportedly to avoid the possibility of the US hijacking the technology to spy on Beijing.

Evidence of another Snowden-like mole is worrying Feds

Evidence of another Snowden-like mole is worrying Feds

The US government has been trying to answer a crucial question: is Snowden a lone wolf, or are other Edward Snowdens out there, leaking ever more classified documents?

Given new leaks published by Glenn Greenwald's The Intercept, the Feds now fear they have their answer, and it is in the affirmative.

Apple faces class action suit for tracking users without consent

Apple faces class action suit over location tracking

A Californian plaintiff says that nobody at Apple ever told her about tracking her whereabouts, nor did anybody ever ask for her permission. She says she only found out about it by watching a recent Chinese state TV report about iPhone being a security risk to the state.

Beefed-up Senate bill takes a swing at the NSA

NSA spyglass. Image courtesy of Shutterstock

If it emerges unscathed from the chamber, it could mean an end to bulk metadata collection, an end to the secrecy the government's been operating under, and reform of the USA Patriot Act that's been used to grant it vast surveillance rights.

iSpy? Researcher exposes backdoor in iPhones and iPads

iphone. Image courtesy of st.djura/Shutterstock.

A "backdoor" that Apple built into iOS for developers can be used to spy on iPhones and iPads by governments, law enforcement, or cyber criminals, according to forensics researcher Jonathan Zdziarski.

Germany considers replacing email with typewriters to evade spying

Germany to replace email with typewriters to duck US spying?

The country's pondering manual typewriters, however, unlike Russia's reported embrace of electric typewriters last year. Russia should be well aware that you can plug a keylogger into those e-typewriters, given that it pulled that stunt on IBM Selectrics back in the 70s!